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After 14 years in a busy group pediatric practice, Dr. Tanya Altmann founded Calabasas Pediatrics, a concierge practice providing personalized pediatric health care with an emphasis on nutrition, a healthy lifestyle and preventive medicine. Suffice it to say, she knows a thing or two about potty training.

From Dr. Tanya’s perspective, it’s important to get your child excited about wearing underwear, as it’s an important milestone to look forward to for both you and your child.

The journey to underwear training is two-fold: 1) getting your child to use the potty and 2) getting them used to no longer wearing diapers.

Because of this new journey, Dr. Tanya likes to call “potty training” – underwear training. Make it fun and set aside a moment to mark the occasion by marking the transition to training underwear.

Here are five tips on “underwear training” from Dr. Tanya and, at the end, a GIVEAWAY from Pampers:


1. Patience is Key.

Underwear training is a developmental milestone and should never be rushed with any child.  It is usually somewhere between two to three years of age when a toddler is ready to begin underwear training.

2. Look for Signs.

You will typically start to notice cues that your child is ready for underwear training. Some of these signs include signaling to you before they go in their diaper, interest in what goes on in the bathroom, the desire to start using the potty, the ability to pull underwear off and on by themselves and the desire to wear big kid underwear.

3. Know the Underwear ABCs.

With underwear training, children need to be able to know a few things like: A). when they need to go, B). how to get to the bathroom, and C). how to get themselves onto the potty. These are essential in order to make underwear training a true victory. Sometimes your child will learn a bit later and that is okay. Give them the time they need to make it successful and easy for both of you.

4. Encourage the Use of Training Pants.

Training pants are a fantastic way to ease into the underwear training process and the best next step after diapers in order to get children used to the feeling of underwear. I recommend Pampers Easy Ups as they have the fit and feel of underwear while still giving children amazing leak protection for day and night. Training pants also help reinforce the concept of pulling underwear on and off, which will make underwear training that much easier.

5. Be Positive and Make it Fun.

Always remember that positive reinforcement is key with your child, and never discipline them for not going. I find that small immediate rewards are the best way to make underwear training a breeze. Create a fun little dance that you do right after they successfully go or find other creative ways to reward them, like a sticker or a hand stamp. It is important to make children feel rewarded for accomplishing this major milestone.


 GIVEAWAY! WOOHOO!

Are you on the verge of potty training your child? Like this Facebook post and be eligible to win a Pampers® East Ups Unboxing experience for your little one. Contest ends Friday, Oct. 21.

Pampers is launching one of the biggest innovations in training pants in years: the new and improved Pampers® Easy Ups™ Training Underwear – a product designed to help little ones and their families during their “Underwear Training” journey.

 


About the Guest Blogger, Dr. Tanya Altmann, M.D. FAAP:

Dr. Tanya is a UCLA-trained pediatrician and mom of three.  She is a best-selling author, network television parenting expert, and entertainment industry and child product industry consultant. As a health expert for numerous news programs and talk shows, including Today (NBC) and KTLA 5 Morning News (CW Los Angeles), Dr. Tanya has discussed breaking medical news stories and controversial parenting issues.

After 14 years in a busy group pediatric practice, Dr. Tanya founded Calabasas Pediatrics, a concierge practice providing personalized pediatric health care with an emphasis on nutrition, a healthy lifestyle and preventive medicine.  She loves being able to spend more time with her patients and be available to them after hours and on weekends, when they often need her most.